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Drunk and driving a car at night with a bottle of alcohol
Smith & Johnson
(231) 946-0700

New Michigan Legislation Allows Clean Slate for First-Time OWI Offenders

Governor Whitmer recently signed legislation allowing for clean slate expungement of convictions for first violation of operating while intoxicated (OWI). The new House Bill, signed into legislation on Monday, August 23rd, is expected to give nearly 200,000 one-time OWI offenders another chance to have a clean record. Another bill, also passed Monday, continues to enforce the .08 blood alcohol content (BAC) level for driving, which was proposed to increase to .10.

The bills provide a second chance of expungement for first-time offenders of the following offenses while operating a vehicle:

  • With a BAC of .08 or higher
  • Visibly impaired by any controlled substance, such as alcohol
  • Under the age of 21 and with a BAC of .02 and higher
  • While under the influence of any bodily amount of cocaine or any Schedule 1 controlled substance

Governor Whitmer said, of the bills: “No one should be defined by a mistake they have made in the past. These bills allow Michiganders to move on from a past mistake in order to have a clean slate. We must clear a path for first-time offenders so that all residents are able to compete for jobs with a clean record and contribute to their communities in a positive way.”

If you have a prior OWI conviction, you could be eligible for a clean slate. The team at Smith & Johnson can help determine your eligibility and help you file the correct paperwork with the correct court to ensure a clean record. Contact attorney Tim Smith at (231) 946-0700 today to see if you’re eligible for expungement due to a single offense OWI conviction.

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